Secondary Bibliography

The secondary bibliography we provide here is derived from the Modern Language Association Bibliography and other sources and aims to identify the most recent books, essay collections, and journal articles published on Hurston in the last ten years. It is continuously updated and supplemented by a list of dissertations also completed in the last five years.

2010

  • Akins, Adrienne. "'Just like Mister Jim': Class Transformation from Cracker to Aristocrat in Hurston's Seraph on the Suwanee. The Mississippi Quarterly. 63: 1-2, 31+.
  • Cotten, Trystan T. "Lost in Translation: Irony and Contradiction in Harpo's Production of Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God.” In Stories of Oprah: The Oprahfication of American Culture. Eds. Trystan T. Cotten and Kimberly Springer. Jackson, MS: UP of Mississippi, 2010. 161-78.
  • Huneycutt, Keith L. "'The Profound Silence of the Initiated': Zora Neale Hurston's Polk County, Dorothy Waring, and Stage Voodoo.” In Florida Studies: Proceedings of the 2009 Annual Meeting of the Florida College English Association. Ed. Claudia Slate and Carole Policy. Newcastle upon Tyne, England: Cambridge Scholars; 2010. 39-49.
  • Regester, Charlene. "The Unconscious and Metaphors in Suzan-Lori Parks's Screenplays of Girl 6 and Their Eyes Were Watching God.” In Suzan-Lori Parks: Essays on the Plays and Other Works. Ed. Philip C. Kolin. Jefferson, NC: McFarland; 2010. 169-180.
  • Williams, Susan Millar. "'Something to feel about'": Zora Neale Hurston and Julia Peterkin in African Town. The Mississippi Quarterly. 63: 1-2, 291.
  • English, Parker. What We Say, Who We Are: Leopold Senghor, Zora Neale Hurston, and the Philosophy of Language. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2010.
  • Lillios, Anna. Crossing the Creek: The Literary Friendship of Zora Neale Hurston and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings. Gainesville, FL: UP of Florida, 2010.

2009

  • Charles, John C. "Talk about the South: Unspeakable Things Unspoken in Zora Neale Hurston's Seraph on the Suwanee.” The Mississippi Quarterly 62:1-2, 19.
  • Frydman, Jason. "Zora Neale Hurston, Biographical Criticism, and African Diasporic Vernacular Culture. MELUS 34: 4, 99.
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  • Kam, Tanya Y. "Velvet Coats and Manicured Nails: The Body Speaks Resistance in Dust Tracks on a Road.” The Southern Literary Journal 42: 1, 73.
  • Ashmawi, Yvonne Mesa-El. "Janie's Tea-Cake: Sinner, Saint, or Merely Mortal?” Explicator 67: 3, 203-06.
  • Banks, Kimberly J. "Polyvocality and Performance in Mules and Men.” In Approaches to Teaching Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Other Works. Ed. John Lowe. New York, NY: Modern Language Association of America, 2009. 131-46.
  • Bauer, Margaret D. "From Gilded Garden to Golden Anniversary: Teaching Hurston's 'The Gilded Six-Bits.'” In Approaches to Teaching Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Other Works. Ed. John Lowe. New York, NY: Modern Language Association of America, 2009. 164-70.
  • Bealer, Tracy L. "Making Hurston's Heroine Her Own: Love and Womanist Resistance in The Color Purple.” In Alice Walker's The Color Purple. Eds. Kheven LaGrone and Michael J. Meyer. Amsterdam, Netherlands: Rodopi, 2009. 23-42, 306.
  • Binggeli, Elizabeth. "The Unadapted: Warner Bros. Reads Zora Neale Hurston.” Cinema Journal 48: 3, 1-15.
  • Blockett, Kimberly D. "Telling Tales in Dust Tracks on a Road: Hurston's Portrait of an Artist.” In Approaches to Teaching Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Other Works. Ed. John Lowe. New York, NY: Modern Language Association of America, 2009. 157-63.
  • Brown-Guillory, Elizabeth. "Africanisms in Hurston's The First One, Color Struck, and Mule Bone.” In Approaches to Teaching Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Other Works. Ed. John Lowe. New York, NY: Modern Language Association of America, 2009. 171-81.
  • Carpenter, Faedra Chatard. "Addressing 'The Complex'-ities of Skin Color: Intra-Racism and the Plays of Hurston, Kennedy, and Orlandersmith.” Theatre Topics 19: 1, 15-27.
  • Cappetti, Carla. "History, Mythology, and the Proletarian in Their Eyes Were Watching God.” In Approaches to Teaching Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Other Works. Ed. John Lowe. New York, NY: Modern Language Association of America, 2009. 37-53.
  • Evans, Robert C. "Class and Complexity in Zora Neale Hurston's ‘The Gilded Six-Bits.'” In A Class of Its Own: Re-Envisioning American Labor Fiction. Eds. Laura Hapke and Lisa A. Kirby. Newcastle upon Tyne, England: Cambridge Scholars, 2008. 156-69.
  • Hall, James C. "Vehicles for Their Talents: Hurston and Wright in Conflict in the Undergraduate Literature Classroom.” In Approaches to Teaching Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Other Works. Ed. John Lowe. New York, NY: Modern Language Association of America, 2009. 81-88.
  • Harris, Trudier. "Celebrating Bigamy and Other Outlaw Behaviors: Hurston, Reputation, and the Problems Inherent in Labeling Janie a Feminist.” In Approaches to Teaching Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Other Works. Ed. John Lowe. New York, NY: Modern Language Association of America, 2009. 67-80.
  • Hicks, Scott. "Rethinking King Cotton: George W. Lee, Zora Neale Hurston, and Global/Local Revisions of the South and the Nation.” Arizona Quarterly: A Journal of American Literature, Culture, and Theory 65: 4, 63-91.
  • Humphries, David T. "Returning South: Reading Culture in James Agee's Let Us Now Praise Famous Men and Zora Neale Hurston's Mules and Men.” Southern Literary Journal 41: 2, 69-86.
  • James, Deborah. "Resistance, Rebirth, and Renewal in Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God.” In Rebirth and Renewal. Ed. Harold Bloom. New York, NY: Bloom's Literary Criticism, 2009. 229-38.
  • Jones, Carolyn M. "Freedom and Identity in Hurston's Moses, Man of the Mountain.” In Approaches to Teaching Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Other Works. Ed. John Lowe. New York, NY: Modern Language Association of America, 2009. 105-19.
  • Jones, Sharon L. Critical Companion to Zora Neale Hurston: A Literary Reference to Her Life and Work. New York: Facts On File, 2009.
  • Lowe, John, ed. Approaches to Teaching Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Other Works. New York: Modern Language Association of America, 2009.
  • Lowe, John. "Laughin' Up a World: Humor and Identity in Their Eyes Were Watching God.” In Approaches to Teaching Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Other Works. Ed. John Lowe. New York, NY: Modern Language Association of America, 2009. 54-66.
  • Lowe, John. "Materials.” In Approaches to Teaching Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Other Works. Ed. John Lowe. New York, NY: Modern Language Association of America, 2009. 5-12.
  • Lowe, John. "Modes of Black Masculinity in Jonah's Gourd Vine.” In Approaches to Teaching Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Other Works. Ed. John Lowe. New York, NY: Modern Language Association of America, 2009. 93-104.
  • Plant, Deborah. "Politics of Self: Individualist Perspectives in Seraph on the Suwanee.” In Approaches to Teaching Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Other Works. Ed. John Lowe. New York, NY: Modern Language Association of America, 2009. 120-30.
  • Shimkus, James. "The Habit of Sir Rabbit: Harris, Hurston, and Welty.” Eudora Welty Review 1: 107-13.
  • Stewart-Shaheed, K. Denea. "Re-Membering Blackness in the Neo-Slave Writings of Octavia Butler and Zora Neale Hurston.” In Reclaiming Home, Remembering Motherhood, Rewriting History: African American and Afro-Caribbean Women's Literature in the Twentieth Century. Ed. Verena Theile and Marie Drews. Newcastle upon Tyne, England: Cambridge Scholars, 2009. 233-51.
  • Trefzer, Annette. "Between Mimesis and Mimicry: Teaching Hurston's Tell My Horse.” In Approaches to Teaching Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Other Works. Ed. John Lowe. New York, NY: Modern Language Association of America, 2009. 147-56.
  • West, Genevieve. "Teaching Their Eyes Were Watching God and the Process of Canon Formation.” In Approaches to Teaching Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Other Works. Ed. John Lowe. New York, NY: Modern Language Association of America, 2009. 21-26.
  • Wilentz, Gay. "False Gods and 'Caucasian Characteristics for All': Hurston's Radical Vision in Their Eyes Were Watching God.” In Approaches to Teaching Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Other Works. Ed. John Lowe. New York, NY: Modern Language Association of America, 2009. 27-36.
  • Williams, Dana A. "The Seams Must Show: Their Eyes Were Watching God as an Introduction to Deconstruction.” In Approaches to Teaching Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Other Works. Ed. John Lowe. New York, NY: Modern Language Association of America, 2009. 89-92.

2008

  • Cayer, Jennifer A. "'Roll Yo' Hips - Don't Roll Yo' Eyes': Angularity and Embodied Spectatorship in Zora Neale Hurston's Play, Cold Keener. Theatre Journal 60: 1, 37-69.
  • Cole, Jean Lee, ed. Zora Neale Hurston: Collected Plays. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers UP, 2008.
  • Cotera, Maria Eugenia. Native Speakers: Ella Deloria, Zora Neale Hurston, Jovita González, and the Poetics of Culture. Austin, TX: U of Texas P, 2008.
  • Dilbeck, Keiko. "Symbolic Representation of Identity in Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God.” Explicator 66: 2, 102-04.
  • Dubek, Laura. "'[J]us' Listenin' tuh You': Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and the Gospel Impulse.” Southern Literary Journal 41: 1, 109-30.
  • Edwards, Erica R. "Moses, Monster of the Mountain: Gendered Violence in Black Leadership's Gothic Tale.” Callaloo: A Journal of African Diaspora Arts and Letters 31: 4, 1084-1102.
  • Eisen, Kurt. "Theatrical Ethnography and Modernist Primitivism in Eugene O'Neill and Zora Neale Hurston.” South Central Review: The Journal of the South Central Modern Language Association 25: 1, 56-73.
  • Evans, Robert C. "Class and Complexity in Zora Neale Hurston's ‘The Gilded Six-Bits.'” In A Class of Its Own: Re-Envisioning American Labor Fiction. Eds. Laura Hapke and Lisa A. Kirby. Newcastle upon Tyne, England: Cambridge Scholars, 2008. 156-69.
  • Evans, Robert C. "Teaching Hurston's ‘The Gilded Six-Bits.'” In A Class of Its Own: Re-Envisioning American Labor Fiction. Eds. Laura Hapke and Lisa A. Kirby. Newcastle upon Tyne, England: Cambridge Scholars, 2008. 277-83.
  • Fischer-Hornung, Dorothea. "'Keep Alive the Powers of Africa': Katherine Dunham, Zora Neale Hurston, Maya Deren, and the Circum-Caribbean Culture of Vodoun.” Atlantic Studies: Literary, Cultural, and Historical Perspectives 5: 3, 347-62.
  • Goldstein, Philip. New Directions in American Reception Study. Ed. Philip Goldstein and James L. Machor. Oxford, England: Oxford UP, 2008. 119-37.
  • Huneycutt, Keith L. "Lumber Mills, Phosphate Pits, and Phantom Land: Polk County, Florida as a Literary Setting.” In Florida Studies: Proceedings of the 2007 Annual Meeting of the Florida College English Association. Eds. Claudia Slate and Keith Huneycutt. Newcastle upon Tyne, England: Cambridge Scholars, 2008. 191-200.
  • Kasper, Valerie E. "Zora Neale Hurston and the Hurricane of 1928.” In Florida Studies: Proceedings of the 2007 Annual Meeting of the Florida College English Association. Eds. Claudia Slate and Keith Huneycutt. Newcastle upon Tyne, England: Cambridge Scholars, 2008. 201-17.
  • King, Lovalerie. The Cambridge Introduction to Zora Neal Hurston. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge UP, 2008.
  • Knapp, Steven. "Zora Neale Hurston: Finding the Meaning of Home in a Florida Author's Life.” In Florida Studies: Proceedings of the 2007 Annual Meeting of the Florida College English Association. Eds. Claudia Slate and Keith Huneycutt. Newcastle upon Tyne, England: Cambridge Scholars, 2008. 45-57.
  • Kraut, Anthea. Choreographing the Folk: The Dance Stagings of Zora Neale Hurston. Minneapolis, MN: U of Minnesota P, 2008.
  • Krouse-Dismukes, Ondra. Cultural Memory in Zora Neale Hurston's Mules and Men. In The Funk Era and Beyond: New Perspectives on Black Popular Culture. Eds. Tony Bolden and Mark Anthony Neal. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008. 193-209.
  • Mallonee, Sarah M. "'The Dream is the Truth': Remembering My Life with Zora Neale Hurston.” In Florida Studies: Proceedings of the 2007 Annual Meeting of the Florida College English Association. Eds. Claudia Slate and Keith Huneycutt. Newcastle upon Tyne, England: Cambridge Scholars, 2008. 59-64.
  • Nitta, Keiko. "Zora Neale Hurston, Selections from Negro (1934).” Eigo Seinen/Rising Generation 154: 8, 454-57.
  • Schweighauser, Philipp. "The Noises of Modernist Form: John Dos Passos's Manhattan Transfer, Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God, and the Soundscapes of Modernity.” In American Studies as Media Studies. Eds. Frank Kelleter and Daniel Stein. Heidelberg, Germany: Universitätsverlag, Winter 2008. 47-55.
  • Szabó, Péter Gaál. "Cultural Space as a Modernist Non-Place in Zora Neale Hurston's Jonah's Gourd Vine. Gender Studies 1: 7, 17-37.

2007

  • Bernard, Patrick S. "The Cognitive Construction of the Self in Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God.” CLC Web: Comparative Literature and Culture 9: 2.
  • Bone, Martyn. "The (Extended) South of Black Folk: Intraregional and Transnational Migrant Labor in Jonah's Gourd Vine and Their Eyes Were Watching God. American Literature: A Journal of Literary History, Criticism, and Bibliography 79: 4, 753-79.
  • Davis, Doris. "'De Talkin' Game': The Creation of Psychic Space in Selected Short Fiction of Zora Neale Hurston.” Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature 26: 2, 269-286.
  • English, Parker. "Performative Speech Acts, ethnography and fiction." Journal of Pragmatics: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Language Studies 39: 9, 1624-37.
  • Fisher, Susan Alice. "'A Glance from God': Zadie Smith's On Beauty and Zora Neale Hurston.” Changing English: Studies in Culture and Education, 14: 3, 285-97.
  • Guttman, Sondra. "'No Tomorrow in the Man': Uncovering the Great Depression in Their Eyes Were Watching God.” Arizona Quarterly: A Journal of American Literature, Culture, and Theory 63: 3, 91-117.
  • Heard, Matthew. ”'Dancing Is Dancing No Matter Who Is Doing It': Zora Neale Hurston, Literacy, and Contemporary Writing Pedagogy.” College Literature 34: 1, 129-55.
  • Heglar, Charles J. "Literary Portraits of Zora Neale Hurston and the Forgotten Image of Laura Burroughs in Bucklin Moon's Without Magnolias.” CLA Journal 50: 4, 379-94.
  • Hood, Judy. "Born with a Skillet in Her Hands.” Southern Quarterly: A Journal of the Arts in the South 44: 2, 74-87.
  • McKnight, Maureen. "Discerning Nostalgia in Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God.” Southern Quarterly: A Journal of the Arts in the South 44: 4, 83-115.
  • Park, Jungman. "Survival-Comedy Dynamics: The Performativity of Verbal Contestation in Hurston's ‘De Turkey and de Law.'” Journal of Modern British and American Drama 20: 1, 31-60.
  • Plant, Deborah G. Zora Neal Hurston: A Biography of the Spirit. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers, 2007.
  • Ryan, Barbara. "'Rubbed and Polished': Reflecting on Zora Neale Hurston's ‘The Conscience of the Court.'” American Literature: A Journal of Literary History, Criticism, and Bibliography 79: 3, 553-75.

2006

  • Baldwin-Philippi, Jessica. In The Image of Power in Literature, Media, and Society: Selected Papers, 2006 Conference, Society for the Interdisciplinary Study of Social Imagery. Ed. Will Wright and Steven Kaplan. Pueblo, CO: Society for the Interdisciplinary Study of Social Imagery, Colorado State University-Pueblo, 2006, 297-300.
  • Burstrem, Jessica B. "The Reclamation of Zora Neale Hurston's Seraph on the Suwanee.” In Florida Studies Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Meeting of the Florida College English Association. Ed. Steve Glassman, Karen Tolchin, and Steve Brahlek. Newcastle upon Tyne, England: Cambridge Scholars, 175-94.
  • Cartwright, Keith. "'To Walk with the Storm': Oya as the Tranformative ‘I' of Zora Neale Hurston's Afro-Atlantic Callings.” American Literature: A Journal of Literary History, Criticism, and Bibliography 78:4, 741-67.
  • Davis, Cynthia. "The Landscape of the Text: Locating Zora Neale Hurston in the Ecocritical Canon.” In Florida Studies Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Meeting of the Florida College English Association. Ed. Steve Glassman, Karen Tolchin, and Steve Brahlek. Newcastle upon Tyne, England: Cambridge Scholars, 149-56.
  • Diamond, Elin. "Deploying/Destroying the Primitivist Body in Hurston and Brecht.” In Against Theatre: Creative Destructions on the Modernist Stage. Ed. Alan L. Ackerman and Martin Puchner. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006, 112-32.
  • Frever, Trinna S. "'Mah Story Ends,' or Does It? Orality in Zora Neale Hurston's ‘The Eatonville Anthology.'” Journal of the Short Story in English 47, 75-86.
  • Fulmer, Jacqueline. Folk Women and Indirection in Morrison, Ní Dhuibhne, Hurston, and Lavin. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2007.
  • Hawkins, Lynn. "Zora in Hot Water-On and Off the Houseboat.” In Florida Studies Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Meeting of the Florida College English Association. Ed. Steve Glassman, Karen Tolchin, and Steve Brahlek. Newcastle upon Tyne, England: Cambridge Scholars, 143-48.
  • Jirousek, Lori. "Ethnics and Ethnographers: Zora Neale Hurston and Anzia Yezierska.” Journal of Modern Literature 29: 2, 19-32.
  • Kaylor, Noel Harold. "Metaphors of Conflict in Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God.” Conflict in Southern Writing. Ed. Ben P. Robertson. Troy, AL: Association for Textual Study and Production, with Troy University, 2006, 93-99.
  • Krasner, David. "'Something's Going on Down Here That Concerns Me': Johnson, Hurston, Bonner, and Hansberry.” In Contemporary African American Women Playwrights. Ed. Philip C. Kolin. London, England: Routledge, 9-27.
  • Ladd, Barbara. Resisting History: Gender, Modernity, and Authorship in William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, and Eudora Welty. Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State UP, 2007.
  • Park, Jungman. "From the Imagined to the Real: Zora Neale Hurston's ‘Committing to the Folk Strategy and Its Effect in ‘Color Struck.'” Journal of Modern British and American Drama 19: 2, 5-37.
  • Park, Jungman. ”Imagined Africa: Zora Neale Hurston's Searching for the Root of Black Identity in ‘Spears.'” Journal of Modern British and American Drama 19: 1, 173-201.
  • Shimkus, James. "The Habit of Sir Rabbit: Harris, Hurston, and Welty.” Eudora Welty Newsletter 30: 2, 6-9.
  • Spencer, Stephen. "Racial Politics and the Literary Reception of Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God." In Multiethnic Literature and Canon Debates. Ed. Mary Jo Bona and Irma Maini. Albany, NY: State U of New York P, 2006, 111-26.
  • Toland-Dix, Shirley. "'This Is the Horse. Will You Ride? Zora Neale Hurston, Erna Brodber, and Rituals of Spirit Possession.” In Just Below South: Intercultural Performance in the Caribbean and the U.S. South. Ed. Jessica Adams, Michael P. Bibler, and Cécile Accilien. Charlottesville, VA: U of Virginia P, 191-210.
  • Turner, Richard Brent. "The Haiti-New Orleans Vodou Connection: Zora Neale Hurston as Initiate-Observer.” In Vodou in Haitian Life and Culture: Invisible Powers. Ed. Claudine Michel and Patrick Bellegarde-Smith. New York: Palgrave, 2006, 117-34.
  • Valkeakari, Tuire. In Reading Women: Literary Figures and Cultural Icons from the Victorian Age to the Present. Ed. Janet Badia and Jennifer Phegley. Toronto, ON: U of Toronto P, 2006, 192-214.
  • Warnes, Andrew. "Guantánamo, Eatonville, Accompong: Barbecue and the Diaspora in the Writings of Zora Neale Hurston.” Journal of American Studies 40: 2, 367-89.

2005

  • Boyd, Valerie. "Enter the Negrotarians.” Scholar and Feminist Online 3: 2, 5 pages.
  • duCille, Ann. "The Mark of Zora: Reading Between the Lines of Legend and Legacy.” Scholar and Feminist Online 3:2, 7 pages.
  • Emery, Amy Fass. "The Zombie In/As the Text: Zora Neale Hurston's Tell My Horse.” African American Review 39:3, 327-36.
  • Hoffman-Jeep, Lynda. "Creating Ethnography: Zora Neale Hurston and Lydia Cabrera.” African American Review 39:3, 337-53.
  • Kanthak, John F. "Legacy of Dysfunction: Family Systems in Zora Neale Hurston's Jonah's Gourd Vine.” Journal of Modern Literature 28: 2, 113-29.
  • Kaplan, Carla. "Editing an Icon.” Scholar and Feminist Online 3: 2, 7 pages.
  • Krasner, David. "Migration, Fragmentation, and Identity: Zora Neale Hurston's Color Struck and the Geography of the Harlem Renaissance.” Scholar and Feminist Online 3: 2, n.p.
  • Kraut, Anthea. "Everybody's Fire Dance: Zora Neale Hurston and American Dance History.” Scholar and Feminist Online 3: 2, 5 pages
  • Millan, Sally. "Janie's Journey: Zora Neale Hurston's Framework for an Alternative Quest.” Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South. 12:1-2, 79-94.
  • Miller, Monica L. "Introduction.” Scholar and Feminist Online 3: 2, n.p.
  • Patterson, Tiffany Ruby. Zora Neale Hurston and a History of Southern Life Philadelphia: Temple UP.
  • Sorensen, Leif. "Modernity on a Global Stage: Hurston's Alternative Modernism.” MELUS: The Journal of the Society for the Study of the Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States. 30: 4, 3-24.
  • Walker, Alice. "Finding a World that I Thought was Lost: Zora Neale Hurston and the People She Looked at Very Hard and Loved Very Much.” Scholar and Feminist Online 3; 2, n.p.
  • Wall, Cheryl A. "Zora Neale Hurston's Essays: On Art and Such.” Scholar and Feminist Online 3:2, 6 pages.
  • Weathers, Glenda B. "Biblical Trees, Biblical Deliverance: Literary Landscapes of Zora Hurston and Toni Morrison.” African American Review 39: 1-2, 201-12.
  • West, M. Genevieve. Zora Neale Hurston and American Literary Culture Gainesville: U of Florida Press.

2004

  • Brantley, Will. "Zora Neale Hurston." Ed. Richard Gray and Owen Robinson. A Companion to the Literature and Culture of the American South. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 472–85.
  • Duck, Anne Leigh. "'Rebirth of a Nation': Hurston in Haiti." Journal of American Folklore 117: 464, 127–46.
  • Gourdine, Angeletta KM. "Colored Readings; or, Interpretation and Raciogendered Body." Ed. Patrocinio P. Schweickart and Elizabeth A. Flynn. Reading Sites: Social Difference and Reader Response.New York: Modern Language Association of America, 60–82.
  • Grant, A.J. and Connie Ruzich. "A Rhetoric of Roads: Their Eyes Were Watching God as Pastoral." Interdisciplinary Literary Studies: A Journal of Criticism and Theory 5:2, 16–28.
  • Grant, Nathan. Masculinist Impulses: Toomer, Hurston, Black Writing, and Modernity. Columbia: U of Missouri P.
  • Haas, Robert. "The Story of Louis Pasteur and the Making of Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God: A Famous Film Influencing a Famous Novel?." Literature/Film Quarterly 32:1, 12–19.
  • Hagood, Taylor. "Ah Ain't Got Nobody: Southern Identity and Signifying on Dialect in Hurston and Faulkner." Publications of the Mississippi Philological Association, 45–53.
  • Hathaway, Rosemary V. "The Unbearable Weight of Authenticity: Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and a Theory of 'Touristic Reading." Journal of American Folklore 117: 464, 168–90.
  • King Lovalerie. "African American Womanism: From Zora Neale Hurston to Alice Walker." Ed. Maryemma Graham. The Cambridge Companion to the African American Novel. Cambridge, England: Cambridge UP, 233–52.
  • Lauden, John. "Reading Hurston Writing." African American Review 38:1, 45–60.
  • Miller, Shawn E. "'Some Other Ways to Try': From Defiance to Creative Submission in Their Eyes Were Watching God." Southern Literary Journal 37:1, 74–95.
  • Pavlic, Edward M. "'Papa Legba, Ouvrier Barriere Pour Moi Passer': Esu in Their Eyes & Zora Neale Hurston's Diasporic Modernism." African American Review 38:1, 61–85.
  • Szabo, Peter Gaal. "The Ambivalence of Zora Neale Hurston's Imaginative Space." B.A.S. British and American Studies/Revista de Studii Britanice si Americane 10, 187–95.
  • Warnes, Andrew. Hunger Overcome?: Food and Resistance in Twentieth–Century African American Literature. Athens, GA: U of Georgia P.
  • Williams, Kimmika L. H. "Ties That Bind: A Comparative Analysis of Zora Neale Hurston's and Geneva Smitherman's Work." Ed. Elaine B. Richardson, et al. African American Rhetoric(s): Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois UP, 86–107.

2003

  • Andersen, Corinne. "'I Dance Wildly inside Myself': Music as Metaphor for Transculturation in Zora Neale Hurston's Autoethnographic Oeuvre." Ed. Michel Delville and Christine Pagnoulle. Sound as Sense: Contemporary U.S. Poetry &/in Music. New Comparative Poetics/Nouvele Poetique Comparatiste 11. Brussels, Belgium: Peter Lang, 45–58.
  • Deffenbacher, Kristina. "Woolf, Hurston, and the House of Self." Ed. Jo Malin and Victoria Boynton. Herspace: Women, Writing, and Solitude. New York: Haworth, 105–21.
  • Henninger, Katherine. "Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, and the Postcolonial Gaze." Mississippi Quarterly: The Journal of Southern Cultures 56:4, 581–95.
  • Jordan, Edwina and Jen Richrath. "The Restless Souls of Zora Neale Hurston and John Steinbeck." English Record 53:3, 22–30.
  • Korobkin, Laura H. "Legal Narratives of Self–Defense and Self–Effacement in Their Eyes Were Watching God." Studies in American Fiction 31:1, 3–28.
  • Kraut, Anthea. "Between Primitivism and Diaspora: The Dance Performances of Josephine Baker, Zora Neale Hurston, and Katherine Dunham." Theatre Journal 55:3, 433–50.
  • Marquis Margaret. "'When de Notion Strikes Me': Body Image, Food, and Desire in Their Eyes Were Watching God." Southern Literary Journal 35:2, 79–88.
  • Newell, Carol E. "Folk Culture in Women's Narratives: Literary Strategies for Diversity in Nationalist Climates." Mississippi Quarterly: The Journal of Southern Cultures, 57:1, 123–34.
  • Newman, Judie. "'Dis Ain't Gimme, Florida': Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God." Modern Language Review 98:4, 817–26.
  • Plant, Deborah G. "The Benedict–Hurston Connection." CLA Journal 46:4, 435–56.
  • Rooney, Monique. "My You: Fannie Hurst, Zora Neale Hurston and Literary Patronage."Working Papers on the Web 5 [no pagination].
  • Sato, Hiroko. "Zora Neale Hurston to no deai." Eigo Seinen/Rising Generation 149:8, 479.
  • Warren, Nagueyalti. "Echoing Zora: Ansa's Other Hand in The Hand I Fan With." CLA Journal 46:3, 362–82.
  • Wilson, Anthony. "The Music of God, Man, and Beast: Spirituality and Modernity in Jonah's Gourd Vine." Southern Literary Journal 35:2, 64–78.

2002

  • Barr, Tina. "'Queen of the Niggerati' and the Nile: The Isis–Osiris Myth in Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God." Journal of Modern Literature 25: 3–4, 101–13.
  • Bass, Holly. "Better Late Than Never: After 60 Years, Zora Neale Hurston's Flavorful Polk County Comes to Life." American Theatre 19:6, 50–52.
  • Carr, Brian and Tova Cooper. "Zora Neale Hurston and Modernism at the Critical Limit." Modern Fiction Studies 48:2, 285–313.
  • Croft, Robert W. A Zora Neale Hurston Companion. Gainesville, FL: UP of Florida.
  • Disheroon–Green, Suzanne. "Bleaching the Color Line: Caste Structures in Lyle Saxon's Children of Strangers and Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God." Ed. Suzanne Disheroon–Green, Lisa Abney, and Robin Miller. Songs of Reconstructing South: Building Literary Louisiana, 1865–1945. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 109–21.
  • Ellis, Juniper. "Enacting Culture: Zora Neale Hurston, Joel Chandler Harris, and Literary Anthropology." Ed. C. James Trotman. Multiculturalism: Roots and Realities. Bloomington, IN: Indiana UP, 155–69.
  • Joseph, Philip. "The Verdict from the Porch: Zora Neale Hurston and Reparative Justice." American Literature: A Journal of Literary History, Criticism, and Bibliography 74:3, 455–83.
  • Kaplan, Carla. Zora Neale Hurston: A Life in Letters. New York: Doubleday.
  • Konzett, Delia Caparoso. Ethnic Modernisms: Anzia Yezierska, Zora Neale Hurston, Jean Ryhs, and the Aesthetics of Dislocation. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Konzett, Delia Caparoso. "'Getting in Touch with the True South': Pet negroes, White Crackers, and Racial Staging in Zora Neale Hurston's Seraph on the Suwanee. Ed. Samina Najmi, Rajini Srikanth, and Elizabeth Ammons. White Women in Racialized Spaces: Imaginative Transformation and ethical Action in Literature. Albany, NY: State U of New York P, 131–46.
  • Lewis, Nghana. "'We Must Speak with the Same Weapons': Re–Inscribing Resistance in Zora Neale Hurston's Dust Tracks on a Road." CLA Journal 45:3, 311–28.
  • Lowe, John. "'Let the People Sing!' Zora Neale Hurston and the Dream of a Negro Theater." Ed. Robert L. McDondald and Linda Rohrer Paige. Southern Women Playwrights: New Essays in Literary History and Criticism. Tuscaloosa, AL: U of Alabama, 11–26.
  • Lowe, John. "Zora Neale Hurston." Ed. Carolyn Perry, Mary Louise Weaks, and Doris Betts. The History of Southern Women's Literature. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 379–85.
  • Manning, Carol S. "Hurston and Welty, Janie and Livvie." Southern Literary Journal 34:2, 64–72.
  • Powers, Peter Kerry. "Gods of Physical Violence, Stopping at Nothing: Masculinity, Religion, and Art in the Work of Zora Neale Hurston." Religion and American Culture 12:2, 229–47.
  • "The Queen of the Harlem Renaissance: Her Works Were Lost, but Not Forever." Journal of Blacks in Higher Education 37, 52–53.
  • Reiger, Christopher. "The Working–Class Pastoral of Zora Neale Hurston's Seraph on the Suwanee." Mississippi Quarterly: The Journal of Southern Cultures 56:1, 105–24.
  • Renfroe, Alicia M. "Interrogations of Justice in Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God." Cycnos 19:2, 213–24.
  • Roberts, Brian R. " Predators in the 'Glades: A Signifying Animal Tale in Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God." Southern Quarterly: A Journal of the Arts in the South 41:1, 39–50.
  • Sample, Maxine. "Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)." Ed. Emmanuel S. Nelson. African American Biographers: A Sourcebook. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 208–19.
  • Schroeder, Patricia. "Rootwork: Arthur Flowers, Zora Neale Hurston, and the 'Literary Hoodoo' Tradition." African American Review 36:2, 263–72.
  • Simmons, Ryan. "'The Hierarchy Itself': Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and the Sacrifice of Narrative Authority." African American Rreview 36:2, 181–93.
  • West, Genevieve. "Feminist Subversion in Zora Neale Hurston's Jonah's Gourd Vine." Women's Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal 31:4, 499–515.

2001

  • Burrows, Stuart. "'You Heard Her, You Ain't Blind': Seeing What's Said in Their Eyes Were Watching God." Novel: A Forum on Fiction 34:3, 434–52.
  • Campbell, Josie P. Student Companion to Zora Neale Hurston. Westport, CT: Greenwood.
  • Champion, Laurie. "Socioeconomics in Selected Short Stories of Zora Neale Hurston." Southern Quarterly: A Journal of the Arts in the South 40:1, 79–92.
  • Clarke, Deborah. "'The Porch Couldn't Talk for Looking': Voice and Vision in Their Eyes Were Watching God."African American Review 35:4, 599–613.
  • Duck, Leigh Anne. "'Go There Tuh Knmow there': Zora Neale Hurston and The Chronotype of The Folk." American Literary History 13:2, 265–94.
  • Gibson, Gloria J. "Cinematic Foremothers: Zora Neale Hurston and Eloyce king Patrick Gist." Ed. Pearl Bowser, Jane Gaines, and Charles Musser. Oscar Micheaux and His Circle: African–American Filmmaking and Race Cinema of the Silent Era. Bloomington, IN: Indiana UP, 195–209.
  • Haddox, Thomas F. "The Logic of Expenditure in Their Eyes Were Watching God." Mosaic: A Journal for the Interdisciplinary Study of Literature 34:1, 19–34.
  • Hoefel, Roseanne. "'Different by Degree': Ella Cara Deloria, Zora Neale Hurston, and Frank Boas Contend with Race and Ethnicity." American Indian Quarterly 25:2, 181–202.
  • Kaplan, Carla. "'Talk to Me': Talk Ethics and Erotics." Ed. S. I. Salamensky. Talk, Talk, Talk: The Cultural Life of Everyday Conversation. New York: Routledge, 63–75.
  • Kehl, D. H. "Kenosis of Biblical texts: Method and Meaning in Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God." MAWA Review 16:1–2, 40–51.
  • Kim, Aeju. "[The Politics of Hurston's Writing: Their Eyes Were Watching God]." Studies in Modern Fiction 8:2, 65–86.
  • Krasner, David. "Migration, Fragmentation, and Identity: Zora Neale Hurston's Color Struck and the Geography of the Harlem Renaissance." Theatre Journal 53:4, 533–50.
  • Kraut, Anthea. "Re–Scripting Origins: Zora Neale Hurston's Staging of Black Vernacular Dance." Ed. Dorothea Fischer–Hornung and Alison D. Goeller, et al. EmBODYing Liberation: The Black Body in American Dance. FORECAST: Forum for European Contributions to African American Studies 4 Munster, Germany: LIT, 59–77.
  • Levy, Valerie. "'That Florida Flavor': Nature and Culture in Zora Neale Hurston's Work for the Federal Writer's Project. Ed. Thomas S. Edwards, Elizabeth A. De Wolfe, and Vera Norwood. Such News of the Land: U.S. Women nature Writers. Hanover, NH: UP of New England, 85–94.
  • Manuel, Carme. "Mule Bone: Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston's Dream Deferred of an African–American Theatre of the Black Word." African American Review 35:1, 77–92.
  • Meehan, Kevin. "Decolonizing Ethnography: Zora Neale Hurston in the Caribbean." Ed. Lizabeth Paravisini and Ivette Romero–Cesareo. Women at Sea: travel Writing and the Margins of Caribbean Discourse. New York: Palgrave, 245–79.
  • Menke, Pamela Glenn. "'Black cat Bone and Snake Wisdom': New Orleanian Hoodoo, Haitian Voodoo, and Rereading Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God." Ed. Suzanne Disheroon Green, Lisa Abney, and Moira Crone. Songs of the New South: Writing Contemporary Louisiana. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 123–39.
  • Oxindine, Annette. "Pear Trees beyond Eden: Women's Knowing Reconfigured in Woolf's To the Lighthouse and Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God." Ed. Beth Rigel Daugherty and Mary Beth Pringle. Approaches to Teaching Woolf's To the Lighthouse. New York: Modern Language Association of America, 163–68.
  • Raynaud, Claudine. "'A Basin in the Mind': Language in Their Eyes Were Watching God." Ed. Genevieve Fabre and Michel Feith. Temples for Tomorrow: Looking Back at the Harlem Renaissance. Bloomington, IN: Indiana UP, 222–35.
  • Roark, Chris. "Hurston's Hamlet: 'My Own Bathtub Singing'." CLA Journal 44:3, 317–40.
  • Wolter, Jurgen C. "From History to Communal Narrative: The Merging of Cultural Paradigms in Their Eyes Were Watching God." Amerikastudien/American Studies 46:2, 233–48.

2000

  • Abdallah, Ayana Rehema. "Privileged Identity: Representation of Subjectivity in Their Eyes Were Watching God." Lesley Marx, Loes Nas, and Chandre Carstens. Juxtapositions: The Harlem Renaissance and the Lost Generation. Cape Town, South Africa: University of Cape Town, 127–35.
  • Champion, Laurie and Bruce A. Glasrud. "Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)." Ed. Emmanuel S. Nelson. African American Authors, 1745–1945: A Bio–Bibliographical Critical Sourcebook. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 259–69.
  • Ciuba, Gary. "The Worm against the Word: The Hermeneutical Challenge in Hurston's Jonah's Gourd Vine." African American Review 34:1, 119–33.
  • Cutchins, Dennis. "Sugar Cane and Sugar Beets: Two Tales of Burning Love." Studies in American Indian Literatures: The Journal of the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures 12:2, 1–12.
  • Fischer–Hornung, Dorothea. "An Island Occupied: The U.S. Marine Occupation of Haiti in Zora Neale Hurston's Tell My Horse and Katherine Dunhams's Island Possessed." Ed. Dorothea Fischer–Hornung and Heike Raphael–Hernandez. Holding Their Own: Perspectives on Multi–Ethnic Literatures of the United States. ZAA Studies: Language Literature Culturei> 10. Tubingen, Germany: Stauffenburg, 153–68.
  • Ford, Sarah. "Necessary Chaos in Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God." CLA Journal 43:4, 407–19.
  • Garner, Lori Ann. "Representations of Speech in the WPA Slave Narratives of Florida and the Writings of Zora Neale Hurston." Western Folklore 59: 3–4, 215–31.
  • Glasrud, Bruce A. and Laurie Champion. "Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)." Ed. Laurie Champion. American Women Writers, 1900–1945: A Bio–Bibliographical Critical Sourcebook. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 162–72.
  • Haas, Robert. "Might Zora Neale Hurston's Janie Woods Be Dying of Rabies? Considerations from Historical Medicine." Literature and Medicine 19:2, 205–28.
  • Hughes, Shiela Hassell. "Tongue–Tied: Rhetoric and Relation in Louise Erdrich's Tracks. MELUS 25:3–4, 87–116.
  • Jackson, Chuck. "Waste and Whiteness: Zora Neale Hurston and the Politics of Eugenics." African American Review 34:4, 639–60.
  • Kadlec, David. "Zora Neale Hurston and the Federal Folk." Modernism/Modernity 7:3, 471–85.
  • Lamothe, Daphne. "Vodou Imagery, African–American tradition and Cultural Transformation in Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God." Callaloo: A Journal of African–American and African Arts and Letters 22:1, 157–75.
  • Lawrence, David Todd. "Folkloric Representation and Extended Context in the Experimental Ethnography of Zora Neale Hurston." Southern Folklore 57:2, 119–34.
  • Meisenhelder, Susan. "False Gods and Black Goddesses in Naylor's Mama Day and Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God." Callaloo: A Journal of African–American and African Arts and Letters 23:4 (Fall), 1440–48.
  • Menefee, Samuel Pyeatt. " Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)." Ed. Carmen Blacker and Hilda Ellis Davidson. Women and Tradition: A Neglected Group of Folklorists. Durham, NC: Carolina Academic, 157–72.
  • Olson, Kirby. "Surrealism, Haiti, and Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God." Real: The Journal of Liberal Arts 25:2, 80–93.
  • Pavlic, Edward. "'Come on in My Kitcjen': Asymmetry, Angularity, and Incremental Repetition in Zora Neale Hurston's Diasporic Modernism." Xcp: Cross–Cultural Poetics 6, 10–19.
  • Pavloska, Susanna. Modern Primitives: Race and Language in Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, and Zora Neale Hurston. New York: Garland.
  • Rowe, John Carlos. "Opening the Gate to the Other America: The Afro–Caribbean Politics of Zora Neale Hurston's Mules and Men and Tell My Horse." Ed. Utz Riese and Doris Dziwas. Kontaktzone Amerika: Literarische Verkehrsformen Kultureller Ubersetzung. Anglistische Forschungen 282. Heidelberg, Germany: Carl Winter Universitatsverlag, 109–56.
  • Tae, Heasook. ""[The Body in Black Women's Literature: Their Eyes Were Watching God and Sula]." Journal of English Language and Literature/Yongo Yongmunhak 46:1, 243–63.
  • Townsend, Rosemary. "The Writing of Their Lives: A Comparative Exploration of Two Women Writers." Lesley Marx, Loes Nas, and Chandre Carstens. Juxtapositions: The Harlem Renaissance and the Lost Generation. Cape Town, South Africa: U of Cape Town, 136–47.
  • Trefzer, Annette. "Possessing the Self: Caribbean Identities in Zora Neale Hurston's Tell My Horse." African American Review 34:2, 299–312.
  • Ward, Cynthia. "From the Suwanee to Egypt, there's No Place Like Home." PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association 115:1, 75–88.
  • Watson, Reginald. "Mulatto as Object in Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and John O. Killen's The Cotillion." CLA Journal 43:4, 383–406.
  • West, Genevieve. "'Looking for Zora': An Addendum." Analytical & Enumerative Bibliography 11:4, 303–09.
  • West, Genevieve. "'Looking for Zora'" A Calendar of Correspondence." Analytical & Enumerative Bibliography 11:2, 124–78.