Thinking About Grad School?

 

Many students who come out of the UCF Humanities Program consider graduate school, but many have a difficult time locating programs that will allow them to do what they want. There are not many graduate programs in "humanities" - most are in specific disciplines. However, we have broken the program into three concentrations (Classical, Multi-cultural, and Critical Humanities), plus one track (Philosophy, Religion & Popular Culture). Whichever concentration/track you have been on should help to direct you to different kinds of grad schools.

Keep in mind that just because a program doesn't have "humanities" in the title, doesn't mean that it isn't appropriate. Think about other interdisciplinary programs that might fit. Some suggestions: American studies, cultural studies, museum studies, liberal arts, liberal studies, great books, visual culture, peace and conflict studies, science, technology and society studies, performance studies, and women's/gender studies.

I will list some possibilities below, but this is by no means an exhaustive list. These are programs our students have gone to in the past, or have applied to, or seem like a good fit. This list is meant as a beginning point; do some more research on your own. I will not separate these out by concentration/track, as many programs will be useful for more than one.

As with any discipline, some programs will be better than others, and some will be more appropriate for you than others. Some of these programs are very rigorous, and others are a loose collection of courses. It is worth thinking about what you want to do with the graduate degree. Are you thinking about teaching at the high school or university level?

Some professional organizations have guides for their members on graduate programs in their areas. If you are thinking about working in (for instance) religious studies, history, or the like, you might check those organizations. There are also some other guides:

 

Certificate Programs

 

Master's Programs

 

M.A. + Ph.D. Programs (may support both programs; students can possibly enter the Ph.D. with a B.A.)

 

Only Ph.D. Programs (must have M.A. to enter)