Resources for Introduction to Philosophy 2010H

Greetings. The resources on this page are meant to supplement the texts and lectures of the Honors Introduction to Philosophy course taught by Bruce Janz at University of Central Florida. These resources are not a substitute for class, readings, or library research; they may, however, enhance all of these. On using the internet for research, please read this page.


General Resources for Introduction to Philosophy

There are some general resources on my philosophy resources page. These include references to a few good large philosophy pages, search engines, etc. There is also a good search engine page, which will help get you started.

This page is no substitute for visiting the library. In particular, a good place to start is with the Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, in the reference section. It has entries on most people and topics we will deal with in this course. Another place to start is with the actual library listings, located here.


Resources for Philosophy 2010H

PHI 102 looks at a few important texts in more depth, with a view to answering three key questions: Who are you? What is the world like? How should we live? These questions are designed to lead to a fourth question: What is philosophy?

Who Are You?

What is the World Like?

How Should We Live?


Who are you?

Resources in this section deal with questions of philosophical anthropology and in general the nature of the self. Readings are from Martin Buber's I and Thou.

Buber Resources

Other Relevant Resources


What is the world like?

This section focusses on issues in metaphysics, epistemology, and the philosophy of science. Readings for this section are from Descartes' Discourse on Method and Meditations on First Philosophy (or another copy here).

On-line versions of Discourse on Method: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

General Resources on metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of science


How should we live?

This section focusses on issues in value theory in general, and in particular ethics, political philosophy, and aesthetics. Readings for this section are from Rousseau's Discourse on the Origin of Inequality.

Resources on Rousseau

General resources on ethics, political philosophy, and aesthetics


Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

This section focusses on issues in philosophical anthropology, existentialism, hermeneutics, and metaphysics. Readings for this section are from Robert Pirsig's Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance.

Contact: janzb@mail.ucf.edu

B. Janz Home Page

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